The Do’s and Don’ts for a Company Dinner

A company dinner is a perfect way to get your team going, but it is of essence that you handle it carefully to ensure you achieve the desired results. The aim of a company dinner is to get the team working in perfect harmony, however, if not done correctly, such an event could strain working relationships and eventually become a stumbling block for your enterprise. Here are some company dinner rules we at Taylor’s have learned from experience over the years:

Do

Allow people to intermingle

A company dinner is a perfect opportunity to have different hierarchies to interact at the same level. Allow managers and subordinates to talk freely in an informal setup. This encourages people to let out some issues they might not be comfortable discussing in the office set up.

Let people bring their outside circle

Often, people will love to bring their relatives or family members to an office dinner. This goes a long way in letting partners or kids understand how your workers operate, and in turn, relieves a lot of pressure from around. Meeting co-workers help family members get more comfortable and accommodative.

Make the setting informal

The whole essence of a company dinner is to create an atmosphere that is different from work. Allow the team to go out and feel the change which is different from their workday attire. An afternoon off on material day is always a great idea to let on.

Don’t

Force any activity on anyone

Many corporates underline certain ‘fun’ activities for company dinners, sidelining some workers while at it. Some companies organise activities like dancing and alcohol intake as compulsory dinner activities. The initial aim is to make everyone let loose, but this often alienates some of the workers. Care to afford everyone the freedom to engage in what feels comfortable to them.

Have a strict programme

Allow the dinner to flow. Let random things happen and don’t be so insistent on bringing them up in future.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *